Kale with Goat Cheese

green,rice — by Johanna

getting stronger

We never had spinach when I was a child. Sometimes they served it in school but as a thin and tasteless soup or as a thick compact side dish for fried fish. In my later youth I was told to eat more spinach, as the iron would make me strong and less pale. It’s true that spinach contains more iron than many other green vegetables. But according to Wikipedia my body can’t really absorb it because spinach also contains a small amount of oxalate. And oxalate actually stops the body to absorb the iron! Hm!

True or not, spinach is still a great and healthy vegetable. I am eating it more now then ever before, (at least 4 times a month). The myth has also given me the taste for other green leaf vegetables such as Chard (mangold), Kale (cabbage), Collard Greens, Dandelion, Mustard Greens and a love-hate feeling for the bitter Broccoli Rabe.

Well this recipe is simple and works with many of the green leaf vegetables.

kale with goat cheese

one bunch of kale
olive oil
two cloves of garlic
chopped dried chili (what kind and how much depends on how spicy you want it)
60 ml (1/4 cup) tamari sauce
60 ml (1/4 cup) of water
one – three tablespoons of sour cream
goat cheese (you can use feta as well)

(serves two or three people)

Clean the kale carefully, trim the stems and chop the leaves into one-inch (25.4 mm) pieces. Peel and chop the garlic into tiny slices. Heat up some olive oil in a pan and sauté the garlic and the chopped chili. When the garlic starts to get golden brown, add kale and sauté until the kale starts to get a little soft. Lower the heat, add water and tamari, cover the pan and let it cook for about three to five minutes. Add some spoons of sour cream and some goat cheese. Stir without boiling for one minute (season with salt and pepper.)

Serve the kale with M:s lovely rice, brown pasta or even kasha (buckwheat).

m:s mixed Rice
(serves two hungry people)

one cup (ca 235 ml) of rice, a mix of Brown Basmati and a small amount of black wild rice
two cups (ca 470 ml) of water
one clove of garlic
one big bay leaf

Sort through for the rice for any odd bits and rinse lightly in water. Put the rice and water into a pressure cooker and turn the heat on high. When the water starts to boil add salt, the whole clove of garlic and bay leaf. Stir and close the pressure cooker. Turn heat to medium and when it starts to steam/hiss turn the heat to low. Cook for 30 minutes. When it’s finished take the pressure cooker from the heat and wait for the pressure to go (about five minutes). Open the pressure cooker and discard the garlic and the bay leaf. Ready to serve!

4 Comments »

  1. Amy:

    The recipes sound great, I’ll have to try them. If you enjoy kale are are trying to get more greens in your diet you might try the braised kale recipe from my website. I’m not sure where I came up with it, but it’s yummy.

    Cheers!

  2. Jane:

    I have just discovered your blog and it is BEAUTIFUL. I love it. I hope that your absence is not permanent… but luckily I have plenty of archives to peruse. I’m very happy you have these recipes posted… I was mentioning on my blog a week or two ago that I want to incorporate more types of greens into my cooking – good to have your recipe and the link in the previous comment! I look forward to exploring your blog!!!!

  3. Deborah Dowd:

    A cook and an artist too! What talent! I love your illustrations (I wish I could do this since I am nota photog either!) I will be checking back!

  4. rita:

    Hi,
    As a former vegetarian eating greens was and still is a daily part of my diet. Some days when this is not possible I have a strong craving for a big bowl of greens to balance me out.

    Greens are fab on there own or mixed. Combine kale, and collards, or chard or dandelions. My favorite way of preparing is wash, add to a pan still wet. The low heat will dry the leaves. Add olive oil, garlic and salt. Saute till limp and serve. You can add lemon juice if you like.

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